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users:pennywu [2018/07/27 22:22]
Penny Wu
users:pennywu [2018/09/18 08:59] (current)
Penny Wu
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 =====Bio===== =====Bio=====
  
-I received my Bachelor'​s degree from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), department of Modern Physics (course 4) which is adjacent to and affiliated with the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. I received my Ph.D. (01/2010) from Boston University (supervisor:​ Professor Nathan Schwadron) in Space Plasma Physics for work performed jointly at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) (mentors: Dr S. Peter Gary and Dr Dan Winske). My Ph.D. thesis {{ :​users:​wu2009dec05.dissertation.pdf | }}, funded by the NASA Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission and LANL's theory programs, addressed the solar wind and the interstellar pick-up ion kinetics in relation to collisionless dissipation at the Heliospheric termination **shock**, the inner boundary of our Solar System. Our analytical theory and computational model have been serving to interpret data acquired by the IBEX and the Voyagers space missions [Wu et al., JGR, 2009 {{ :​users:​wu2009jgr.pdf | }}; Wu et al., JGR, 2010 {{ :​users:​wu2010jgr.pdf | }}]. Many years later, I watched "//The Farthest//",​ a 2017 documentary about the Voyagers'​ decades of journey to travel out of the Solar System. Despite the familiarity,​ I was still deeply moved by the final song, "​We'​ve won the race/ We've claimed our place/ Forever ​cold and lost in space..."​+I received my Bachelor'​s degree ​(2001) ​from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), department of Modern Physics (course 4) which is adjacent to and affiliated with the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. I received my Ph.D. (01/2010) from Boston University (supervisor:​ Professor Nathan Schwadron) in Space Plasma Physics for work performed jointly at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) (mentors: Dr S. Peter Gary and Dr Dan Winske). My Ph.D. thesis {{ :​users:​wu2009dec05.dissertation.pdf | }}, funded by the NASA Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission and LANL's theory programs, addressed the solar wind and the interstellar pick-up ion kinetics in relation to collisionless dissipation at the Heliospheric termination **shock**, the inner boundary of our Solar System. Our analytical theory and computational model have been serving to interpret data acquired by the IBEX and the Voyagers space missions [Wu et al., JGR, 2009 {{ :​users:​wu2009jgr.pdf | }}; Wu et al., JGR, 2010 {{ :​users:​wu2010jgr.pdf | }}]. Many years later, I watched "//The Farthest//",​ a 2017 documentary about the Voyagers'​ decades of journey to travel out of the Solar System. Despite the familiarity,​ I was still deeply moved by the final song, "​We'​ve won the race/ We've claimed our place/ Forever/ Cold and lost in space..."​
  
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-I continued to work on theoretical and computational plasma physics during my time as a postdoc (mentors: Professor Michael Shay and Professor William H. Matthaeus) and subsequently a research scientist at the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware (Udel). My focus during my postdoc period (2010-2012) was **magnetic reconnection**. We demonstrated that low inflow density, common in the geospace magnetotail,​ leads to violent reconnection with faster rates and a series of drastic changes in the reconnection diffusion region [Wu et al., Phys. Plasmas, 2011 {{ :​users:​wu2012grl.pdf| }}]. We further elucidated kinetic ion heating by specular reflections at the dipolarization front in the reconnection exhaust [Wu and Shay, GRL, 2012 {{ :​users:​wu2012grl.pdf | }}]. As a research scientist (2012-2014),​ I was fascinated by **plasma turbulence**,​ exploring its universality (von Karmen similarity decay) [Wu et al. PRL, 2013 {{ :​users:​wu2013prl.pdf | }}], its intermittency as manifested in the formation of dissipative current sheets and reconnection sites [Wu et al. APJL, 2013 {{ :​users:​wu2013apjl.pdf | }}], and its effect on ion-electron heating [Wu et al., PRL, 2013 {{ :​users:​wu2013prl.pdf | }}, Matthaeus et al. APJL, 2016 {{ :​users:​matthaeus2016apjl.pdf | }}]. A state-of-art massively parallel electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation I performed have been posted by colleagues on [[http://​www.physics.udel.edu/​~whm/​UD-plasma-sims.html#​|Udel'​s website]] (also available ​on [[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=DAtLhKrF37o&​feature=youtu.be/​UD-plasma-sims.html#​|youtube]]). Our research was funded by several NASA and National Science Foundation (NSF) programs as well as the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission (launched 2015) and the incoming ​[[https://​www.nasa.gov/​content/​goddard/​parker-solar-probe|Parker Solar Probe]] (PSP) mission (**launch window this summer 11/08/2018-19/08/2018!**). To be the first spacecraft to travel to our star the Sun's h**O**t (~10<​sup>​6</​sup>​degree) Corona, PSP will be breathtaking. Quite the opposite of "//The Furthest//",​ would this mission be a topic of a future documentary "//The closest//"​ (to a star) or "//The hottest//"?​ 8-)  ​+I continued to work on theoretical and computational plasma physics during my time as a postdoc (mentors: Professor Michael Shay and Professor William H. Matthaeus) and subsequently a research scientist at the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware (Udel). My focus during my postdoc period (2010-2012) was **magnetic reconnection**. We demonstrated that low inflow density, common in the geospace magnetotail,​ leads to violent reconnection with faster rates and a series of drastic changes in the reconnection diffusion region [Wu et al., Phys. Plasmas, 2011 {{ :​users:​wu2012grl.pdf| }}]. We further elucidated kinetic ion heating by specular reflections at the dipolarization front in the reconnection exhaust [Wu and Shay, GRL, 2012 {{ :​users:​wu2012grl.pdf | }}]. As a research scientist (2012-2014),​ I was fascinated by **plasma turbulence**,​ exploring its universality (von Karmen similarity decay) [Wu et al. PRL, 2013 {{ :​users:​wu2013prl.pdf | }}], its intermittency as manifested in the formation of dissipative current sheets and reconnection sites [Wu et al. APJL, 2013 {{ :​users:​wu2013apjl.pdf | }}], and its effect on ion-electron heating [Wu et al., PRL, 2013 {{ :​users:​wu2013prl.pdf | }}, Matthaeus et al. APJL, 2016 {{ :​users:​matthaeus2016apjl.pdf | }}]. A state-of-art massively parallel electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation I performed have been posted by colleagues on [[http://​www.physics.udel.edu/​~whm/​UD-plasma-sims.html#​|Udel'​s website]] (also by Professor Matthaeus ​on [[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=DAtLhKrF37o&​feature=youtu.be/​UD-plasma-sims.html#​|youtube]]). Our research was funded by several NASA and National Science Foundation (NSF) programs as well as the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission (launched 2015) and the [[https://​www.nasa.gov/​content/​goddard/​parker-solar-probe|Parker Solar Probe]] (PSP) mission ([[http://www.iopblog.org/​witnessing-the-launch-of-the-parker-solar-probe/|I attended the launch on August 12, 2018 at Cape Canaveral, Florida]]). As the first spacecraft to travel to a star our Sun's h**O**t (~10<​sup>​6</​sup>​degree) Corona, PSP is breathtaking. Quite the opposite of "//The Furthest//",​ would this mission be a topic of a future documentary "//The closest//"​ (to a star) or "//The hottest//"?​ 8-)  ​
  
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-I was awarded a 3-year STFC Daphne Jackson in February 2018. Currently, I am thrilled to be formally back to research. Of interests are the dynamic processes--shock,​ magnetic reconnection,​ and turbulence---in the denser, ​(weaklycollisional,​ and radiative lower solar atmosphere plasmas, where plasmas go through recombination and ionisation, a very different (from the collisionless space plasmas that I've worked on) regime for me to explore. I enjoy my new challenge and look forward to the 2019 completion of the [[https://​dkist.nso.edu/​|Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST)]], the largest solar telescope-to-be in the world.+I was awarded a 3-year STFC Daphne Jackson in February 2018. Currently, I am thrilled to be formally back to research. Of interests are the dynamic processes--shock,​ magnetic reconnection,​ and turbulence---in the denser, ​collisional/​weakly collisional,​ and radiative lower solar atmosphere plasmas, where plasmas go through recombination and ionisation, a very different (from the collisionless space plasmas that I've worked on) regime for me to explore. I enjoy my new challenge and look forward to the 2019 completion of the [[https://​dkist.nso.edu/​|Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST)]], the largest solar telescope-to-be in the world.
  
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 Physical Review Letters, 114 (17), 175002 (5pp), 2015. {{ :​users:​wan2015prl.pdf |pdf}} Physical Review Letters, 114 (17), 175002 (5pp), 2015. {{ :​users:​wan2015prl.pdf |pdf}}
    
-14. “Intermittency,​ coherent structures and dissipation in plasma turbulence”+14. “Intermittency,​ coherent structures and dissipation in plasma turbulence” ​([[https://​aip-info.org/​1XPS-5MOYN-DDC9S28PE7/​cr.aspx|Selected as a top pick by the Journal editor]])
  
 Wan, M., W. H. Matthaeus, V. Roytershteyn,​ T. Parashar, **P. Wu** and H. Karimabadi Wan, M., W. H. Matthaeus, V. Roytershteyn,​ T. Parashar, **P. Wu** and H. Karimabadi
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 Email: penny.wu@qub.ac.uk Email: penny.wu@qub.ac.uk
  
-Phone: +44 28 9097 3213+Phone: +44 28 9097 3213 (Office)
users/pennywu.1532730127.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/07/27 22:22 by Penny Wu

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